Workshops

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Quotes From Workshop Attendees

Pitch Your Book

Fiction Genres: Where Does Your Book Fit?

The Writer's Toolbox

The Second Log Line

Promoting Yourself Workshop

Creating and Selling Your Non-fiction Book: From Idea to Publication

Interning: How to Get Free Help and What to Do Once You Have It

Writer's Boot Camp

Customized Workshops for Your Group

References

 

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Quotes from Workshop Attendees:

What both experienced and new authors have to say about my workshops.

 - "Everyone that wants to sell a book has to make that giant step through the door and speak, yes, speak to an editor or and agent. I know you'd rather face man-eating lions. I heard Linda Rohrbough's presentation at the Red River, New Mexico Conference and it would prepare anyone for the lion's den. I attend and speak at several conferences in the year and hers is the best one on this vital step in your career. She'd be a real asset to speak at any writer's conference. Fledgling or pro, her session will be well worth your time to attend." - Award-winning western author Dusty Richards. (Click on the link to drop in at DustyRichards.com.)

 - "OKAY, Huge thank you! I spoke to the Flower Mound Women's Club last night, and, because of you was able to speak about the log line AND the theme of my book -- I looked smart and it enriched my talk." - Award-winning author Sarah Clark Jordan (www.SarahClarkJordan.com)

 - "I get it [now] about genre and log lines and the differences and purposes of all this."

 - "This workshop gives real-world advice useful to new authors."

 - "Practical principles well explained."

 - "The (Writer's Toolbox) session was run by Linda Rohrbough, a highly energetic teacher and published author. Her focus is on producing well-structured, saleable work . . . Linda just poured information out over our hour and a half. No way can I document it all. She also had handouts. Great info!"  (From an article written by an attendee.)

 - "I attended a class Linda conducted [at the Writers' League of Texas conference] that was instrumental in pushing me over the hump in completing my second novel. Her class, 'Learning to Talk About Your [Book]' was the best writing investment I've made in a long, long time. I knew the story I wanted to tell . . . the setting . . . the characters; but I wasn't sure if I was writing a mystery or suspense novel and she cleared that up for me with excellent examples of various genres. In addition, I learned some typing shortcuts that helped immensely. The draft was over 425 pages and the publisher wanted about 350 pages. Her tips regarding double spacing after punctuation, using Widows and Orphans, and other information helped me meet my goal. Exercises writing log lines were particularly helpful. Now my novel was [sic] released and is posted on a half-dozen web sites including a brief appearance on the big screen PRN in Times Square." - author Les Coalson (www.LesCoalson.com).

 - "Although I knew about the importance of log lines--those 25 words that best sum up the book--I was at a loss as to what to say after that. I used to either try to give a mini synopsis or just babble on about the characters and the setting. Thanks to Linda's workshop, "The Second Log Line," I now have a follow-up that sounds smart and exciting and makes the reader want more. My queries and pitches have both improved thanks to Linda's technique. The first agent I tried it on immediately handed me her business card and asked for sample pages." (This author recently wrote in to say she is now represented by an agent.)

To see if I'm available for your upcoming event, click here.

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Pitch Your Book: Learn How to Talk About Your Book to an Editor or Agent

Overview:

The most important thing a pre-published author learns is how to talk about his or her work in a way that attracts interest from an editor or agent. It's one thing to create a book; it’s a very different skill set to talk about that book, or “pitch” it, to a total stranger.

In this interactive workshop, I use easy-to-understand techniques to teach participants the all-important skill of pitching their work to editors or agents. Participants will learn a simple three-step formula for pitching any book, fiction or non-fiction; critical principles for success; and the most important things a writer must know about his or her manuscript.

I cover the background work such as:

  - How to write a log line.

  - Using the second log line to give your pitch pizzazz.

  - Developing your theme to make your work stand out to a publishing professional.

  - How to create an effective synopsis in different lengths for using pitching.

  - Examples of how the pros use these elements to pitch.

For pitching in person, I'll explain:

 - Dressing for success.

 - What to bring with you.

 - What not to bring with you.

 - Talking about your book in a way that's compelling to an editor or agent.

 - Effective ways to deliver your pitch.

 - What to expect.

When pitching by mail, I present:

 - What a successful query letter contains.

 - The time line.

 - Tricks and tips the pros use.

 - Preparing for success.

I offer plenty of examples of effective pitches that I and other experienced authors have used to sell, both verbally and in writing.

The two-hour version of this workshop covers the three-step formula along with the necessary skills authors need to pitch successfully. The half-day version combines my combines my Fiction Genres workshop (which adds insight into publishing genres and helps authors pinpoint where their book falls) and Pitch Your Book  to teach authors the basics of how to talk about their work.

This workshop is best when presented to a group of twenty or more.

Note: Writers are looking for this material. In the Fall of 2009, the North Carolina Writers' Network had ninety percent of their conference attendees sign up for my workshop, so they ended up placing me in the hotel's largest meeting room. In 2005 and 2006 alone, my workshops sold out two months in advance of the Writers' League of Texas Annual Agents and Editors Conference.

 

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Fiction Genres: Where Does Your Book Fit?

Overview:

Would it surprise you to learn the number one reason authors get rejected, according to agents, is genre? Yet this seems to be an area everyone has mastered. Or have they?

Genres have specific requirements that include story elements and word count. In this workshop, I explain the parameters of each genre. Participants will learn what genre is, the “hidden genre” questions asked by industry pros (and how to answer), the elements of specific genres, the most popular genres, and which genres work best for new writers to break into.

After this workshop, you'll know the answers to the following questions:

 - How do I determine where my book fits in the genres agents and editors are looking for?

 - What are the rules, how can I break them, and when should I?

 - What does an agent or editor mean when they say they're accepting Speculative Fiction?

 - What is the difference between Suspense and Mystery?

 - What is Chick Lit? What are the other subcategories in this genre?

 - If an editor says they're looking for Romantic Suspense, what does that mean?

 - What are the best-selling genres and how are they defined?

 - What are the best genres for new writers to break in?

This workshop got started due to an article I wrote, "The Genre Hurdle," published in the Pikes Peak Writer NewsMagazine for distribution at their annual conference. The Pikes Peak Writers Conference is one of the top ten writing conferences in the nation according to Writer's Digest Magazine.

 

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The Writer's Toolbox

Overview:

In this workshop, I present a detailed overview of the novel development cycle and the various "tools" writers use for growing a novel including various plotting grids, story line development tracking tools, character arc development worksheets, character development grids, and subplot development tools. I also offer examples of various editing tools for smoothing the rough spots once a novel is complete.

 

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The Second Log Line

Overview:

The secret to transitioning from being a pre-published writer to a published writer is learning to talk about your work in an interesting way to people you don't know. Adding a second “log line” will give your book extra pizzazz when talking to agents and editors.

In “The Second Log Line,” I'll teach you how a strong log line (a one-sentence description of the book), followed by a second log line that takes into account the major change in the story, allows the writer to start a dialog with a publishing professional, and creates interest and identification in the listener or reader. Participants will leave this workshop with their own versions of a second log line and a plan for using it with an editor or agent.

 

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Promoting Yourself 

Overview:

Writers don’t need a huge marketing budget to promote themselves like the pros do.

In this workshop, I share the simple tips and tricks professional publicists use. I'll point out common mistakes, often-missed opportunities first time authors make in promoting themselves, and how to get the very most out of promotional efforts.

As part of this workshop, I will show you samples of material from successful promotion campaigns I've done for myself and for writers groups.

 

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Creating and Selling Your Non-fiction Book: From Idea to Publication

Overview:

Non-fiction is lucrative, easier for new writers to get into, and pays better at the beginning levels.

In this nuts-and-bolts workshop, I give participants all the information they need to get started. I’ll cover topics such as: steps to success, turning interests into books, writing the proposal, what agents and editors look for in a proposal, and co-author relationships. Participants will leave with the tools they need to put together and sell a non-fiction book proposal – without writing the entire book.

Topics covered include:

 - The Steps to Success (idea, proposal, agent, etc.)

 - How to Turn Your Interests, Experience, Expertise or Hobbies into a Successful Book Idea

 - Writing the Proposal (I'll show you actual successful proposals and the resulting books.)

 - What Agents and Editors are Looking For in a Proposal

 - Getting an Agent (or Not)

 - Co-author Relationships

 

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Interning: How to Get Free Help and What to Do Once You Have It

Overview: 

The time-honored practice of interning, used by artists for centuries, can boost an established writer's career and provide a competitive edge to the published writer on a budget, all while helping new writers to develop their own careers.

In this workshop designed for both published and new authors, Linda offers practical guidelines for implementing an internship, as well as down-to-earth tips and tricks for making this relationship work for both the author and the intern.

Published writers will learn what an intern can do for them, how to make the most of an intern to promote the writer and his/her work, where to look for interns, and what to expect in the intern relationship.

New writers will learn how to land an intern position, and how they can develop their own careers in just a few hours a week working with a professional.

 

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Writer's Boot Camp

Overview:

Soldiers go to boot camp to train for a tactical advantage. The Writer's Boot Camp uses the same concept to teach fiction and non-fiction writers alike writers how to survive – and even thrive – in the publishing world.

This week-long University-level course offers everything the writer needs to know about organizing ideas, developing a career plan, selling manuscripts, and marketing books! In this hands-on workshop, I will provide writers everything they need to know to give their writing career the jump-start it needs. Participants will leave with a solid, personalized plan and know how to execute it from day one.

Topics covered in DETAIL include: presenting yourself like a pro; learning to pitch; knowing how to use your tools; organization for creative people; managing writers block and uncovering your own circadian rhythms to boost productivity; effective promotion of your work; practical tips for working with agents, editors and publicists; developing your career path; and boosting your income through work for hire and ghostwriting.

You'll get to work one-on-one with me to get your career plan in place, learn to handle problems, see successful proposals, learn to talk the talk, and walk out ready to deliver the goods.

 

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Customized Workshops for Your Group

I can, and often do, modify these workshops to fit your group, your time frame, and your particular needs. Contact me if you need a more customized approach for your particular group's needs.

 

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References:

 I've presented workshops to many groups including:

 Writers League of Texas Agents and Editors Conference

 North Carolina Writers' Network Conference

 Ozarks Writers League

 Pikes Peak Writers
 
 Dallas/Fort Worth Writers' Conference and the Grapevine, Texas Public Library

 Act Four Writers, Santa Barbara, California

 Keynote speaker Maumelle Writers Conference

 

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To see if I'm available for your upcoming event,

click here.

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